Filipino Food Recipes : Itlog na Maalat

Appetizers , Featured , Filipino Recipes Apr 11, 2014 No Comments
filipino food recipes

Image from: iampinoypi.blogspot.com

Everyone loves their eggs. From breakfast, desserts and snacks, we can’t get enough of using it on almost all of our meals.

Itlog na Maalat (literally means ‘salty egg’ in Tagalog) is actually introduced by the early Chinese merchants before the Spanish came. The enterprising traders prepared this by soaking eggs on salted charcoal. The early Filipinos learned the trade and they started developing their own technique. They also cook it with other Filipino recipes.

Here, we will show you three ways of making your own salted duck eggs. Despite its time-consuming process, its delectable taste is surely worth the wait.

Ingredients:

Simple method:

12 fresh duck eggs*

6 cups water

1 ¾ to 2 cups salt

*Note: If it’s impossible to look for duck eggs, buy chicken eggs instead.

Procedures:

Wash the duck (or chicken eggs) carefully. Then, on a bottled jar or a plastic container, pour water and salt. Mix the solution until the salt is dissolved. Put the eggs cautiously inside the bottled jar or plastic container.

Cover the jar or container tightly. Make sure the eggs are not floating and it is fully submerged into brine solution. Keep it on a dark and cool place and wait for at least three (3) weeks before taking it.

To determine if the eggs are salty enough for your own taste, try to take a piece from the container. Boil it for 25 to 30 minutes, cool it and then peel it. If it tastes just right, it means that the eggs have the right flavor. Otherwise, let if submerged for another week. Repeat the process until you achieved your desired preference.

 

Pateros Method:

After the early Taga-ilog folks (river dwellers of Pasig River) were acquainted by their Chinese traders about their salted eggs, they find innovative ideas to create their own, native version. They called it Pateros Method, which originated on the town of Pateros in Metro Manila.

Ingredients:

12 fresh duck eggs*

6 cups water

1 ¾ to 2 cups salt

Procedures:

Prepare the mud by getting loamy clay on your backyard. If you can’t find any termite or ant mound nearby, you can improvise with digging yellow or orange clumps of earth from your background.

Mix the clay into the water and salt until it achieves a frothy consistency. If this happens, you can start submerging the eggs into the mixture. Wait for at least three weeks before tasting.

Flavored Salted Duck Eggs:

This is a recent innovation invented by students on a college in Occidental Mindoro. It was recognized by a Philippine government agency last November 2013. There are four flavors to choose from; honey, garlic, adobo and cheese.

The natural condiments are easy to do. Get a fresh honey from your local store, sauté 1 to ½ cups of garlic, get the leftover sauce from your adobo dish, and melt ¼ to ½ cup of cheese.

The process is simple. On the brine solution, add your chosen flavors to the bottle before adding the eggs. Then wait for at least fifteen days before cooking.

Salted duck eggs are perfect for any meal. It can also be added to dishes such as bibingka, the ubiquitous rice cake served during Christmas season. Its salty is also a good match for other vegetable salad or other Filipino Food Recipes.  Try this easy and uncomplicated egg delicacy today.

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